Arezzo is a city and comune in Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany.
Arezzo is about 80 kilometres (50 miles) southeast of Florence, at an elevation of 296 metres (971 ft) above sea level.

Described by Livy as one of the Capitae Etruriae (Etruscan capitals), Arezzo (Aritim in Etruscan) is believed to have been one of the twelve most important
Etruscan cities—the so-called Dodecapolis, part of the Etruscan League.

Etruscan remains establish that the acropolis of San Cornelio, a small hill next to that of San Donatus, was occupied and fortified in the Etruscan period. There is other significant Etruscan evidence: parts of walls, an Etruscan necropolis on Poggio del Sole (still named “Hill of the Sun”), and most famously, the two bronzes, the “Chimera of Arezzo” (5th century BC) and the “Minerva” (4th century BC) which were discovered in the 16th century and taken to Florence. Increasing trade connections with Greece also brought some elite goods to the Etruscan nobles of Arezzo: the krater painted by Euphronios ca 510 BC with a battle against Amazons (in the Museo Civico, Arezzo 1465) is unsurpassed.

Arezzo is set on a steep hill rising from the floodplain of the River Arno. In the upper part of the town are the cathedral, the town hall and the Medici Fortress (Fortezza Medicea), from which the main streets branch off towards the lower part as far as the gates.
The upper part of the town maintains its medieval appearance despite the addition of later structures.

The Piazza Grande is the most noteworthy medieval square in the city, opening behind the 13th century Romanesque apse of Santa Maria della Pieve.
Once the main marketplace of the city, it is currently the site of the Giostra del Saracino (“Joust of the Saracen”).

Arezzo, a lot of things to be seen, in a calm city. The thread conductor that ties a lot of cities of Tuscany.

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